A little Pit History

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas

A little Pit History

Message  Brian le Jeu 21 Juil - 22:44

The Blood Sports

Blood sports were so much a part of daily life in England that around 1800, in the town of Wednesbury in Staffordshire county, church bells rang in celebration of "Old Sal," when she finally managed to have puppies. Sal was famous for gameness but had never been able to whelp a litter. If a Bulldog bitch died during whelping in that mining district, women often raised the puppies by suckling them at their own breasts. Bullbaiting and other blood sports were not just entertainment for the working classes, but for all classes. In fact, kings and queens often mandated that a contest be arranged. When French ambassadors visited the court of Queen Elizabeth in 1559, the Queen graciously entertained them with a fine dinner followed by an exhibition of dogs baiting bulls and bears.


The Bull-And-Terrier

In the early 1800, some Bulldog breeders tried something new, hoping to breed faster, fiercer fighters. They bred the most formidable baiting and fighting Bulldogs with the toughest, quickest and bravest terriers. This cross was believed to enhance the fighting ability of the Bulldog by reducing his size while maintaining his strength and increasing his speed and agility. Although some historians say the smooth-coated Black-and-Tan and the White English Terrier (now extinct) were most frequently crossed with

Bulldogs, others say the terriers were chosen only on the basis of gameness and working ability, and that a variety of terrier-like dogs were used. The result or these crosses was called the Bull-and-Terrier or the Half-and-Half. As time passed and Bull-and-Terriers were selectively bred, they became recognizable as an emerging breed.


Arrival in America
Blood sports were popular in America, too, and the first Bulldogs and Bull-and-Terriers imported to the New World were brought over for that purpose. While bearbaiting was banned in New England as early as the 1600s, public spectacles such as bullbaiting, rat-killing competitions for dogs, dogfighting and cockfighting were extremely popular in New York City during the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. Nearly all of America's early fighting dogs were British or Irish imports bred for generations to do battle, and many of the Americans who imported them continued breeding them for the same purpose. Dogfighting was so accepted in America that in 1881, when a fight was held in Louisville between the famed English imports, Lloyd's Pilot, owned by "Cockney Charlie" Lloyd, and Crib, owned by Louis Kreiger, the Ohio and Mississippi Railroad advertised special excursion fares to the big battle. Upon arrival in Louisville, bettors and spectators were taken to a fine hotel where they were warmly welcomed by the president of the Louisville board of alderman, the police chief and other local officials. The referee for the fight was William Harding, sports editor of The Police Gazette, and owner-publisher Richard K. Fox served as stakeholder. Pilot and Crib each weighed in at just under 28 pounds, and thrilled the spectators by fighting gamely for an hour and twenty-five minutes before Pilot won the victory.


Americanization of the Breed

Pilot and Crib, two of the most famous dogs of their period, weighed under 28 pounds, yet the weight of a male Pit Bull today ranges from 40 to 65 pounds. What happened? Pilot and Crib were at fighting weight, but though they would normally have weighed several pounds more, it would not have been nearly enough to make up the difference. One explanation is that because Americans always seem to believe bigger is better, they selected bigger dogs for breeding and thereby created a larger animal. Although this theory is partly correct, there is more to the story. It is believed that the breed's general usefulness on the frontier was a factor in increasing its size.

The American pioneers discovered the Bull-and-Terrier's versatility, bravery and devotion, and soon the dogs traveled west, becoming indispensable members of many ranch and farm families. The dogs were well-suited to life on the frontier, and guarded homesteads and children with confidence and authority. Many of them also helped round up stock. In addition, they protected the farm animals from predators and varmits ranging from rats and snakes to coyotes and bears. Eventally, the settlers probably decided that a slightly larger dog, with the same body style and bravery, would have an even better chance of defending the stock against marauding mountain lions and ravaging wolves. Consequently, when selecting breeding partners for their dogs, they chose larger specimens.

The Dog of the Day

Every dog does not have his day, but the Pit Bull certainly did. His day was just before and during World War I, when he was so highly regarded that he represented the U.S. on a World War I poster depicting each of the Allied forces as a gallant dog native to his country. During that time, many issues of Life magazine featured political cartoons with Pit Bulls as the main characters.
Pit Bulls even graced the covers of Life on February 4, 1915, and again on March 24, 1917. The first picture, captioned " The Morning After," showed a bandaged and scarred Pit Bull; the later one, captioned "After Six," displayed a gentlemanly Pit Bull in a bow tie and top hat. both were drawn by Will Rannells.

During World War I, the breed proved deserving of its country's esteem. A Pit Bull named Stubby was the war's most outstanding Canine Soldier. He earned the rank of sergeant, was mentioned in official dispatches and earned two medals, one for warning of a gas attack and the other for holding a German spy at Chemin des Dames until American troops arrived.
Following the war, the Pit Bull's popularity continued to grow. Depending on what it was used for and where it lived, the breed was still known by many different names, such as Bulldog, American Bull Terrier, Brindle Bull Dog, Yankee Terrier, Pit Dog, and, of course, American Pit Bull Terrier.



avatar
Brian

Messages : 3042
Date d'inscription : 07/11/2008

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: A little Pit History

Message  Invité le Ven 22 Juil - 17:06

beaucoup de boulo de traduction pour moi hihi...
Super intéressant!!

Invité
Invité


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: A little Pit History

Message  Christine le Ven 22 Juil - 18:08

lol! lol! lol! Pour une fois que ce n'est pas moi qui doit la faire lol! lol! lol!

_________________
J'ai décidé d'être heureux parce que c'est bon pour la santé - Voltaire
Nos livres : http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/theoaks

Nos Magazines :
http://www.etsy.com/shop/FaiiryLight?section_id=11851671
http://www.celticoak-chiens-de-france.com
avatar
Christine
Admin

Messages : 27917
Date d'inscription : 06/11/2008
Age : 46
Localisation : Plus tu t'en fout, plus tu seras heureux !

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.celticoak-chiens-de-france.com

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: A little Pit History

Message  Invité le Ven 22 Juil - 20:21

ah ouai ok je savais pas que tu allais traduire je me suis fais gruger lol! lol! albino

Invité
Invité


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: A little Pit History

Message  Christine le Ven 22 Juil - 20:23

Pffff j'aurais mieux fais de me taire lol! lol! lol!

_________________
J'ai décidé d'être heureux parce que c'est bon pour la santé - Voltaire
Nos livres : http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/theoaks

Nos Magazines :
http://www.etsy.com/shop/FaiiryLight?section_id=11851671
http://www.celticoak-chiens-de-france.com
avatar
Christine
Admin

Messages : 27917
Date d'inscription : 06/11/2008
Age : 46
Localisation : Plus tu t'en fout, plus tu seras heureux !

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.celticoak-chiens-de-france.com

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: A little Pit History

Message  Invité le Ven 22 Juil - 20:39

en effet hihihi...si tu veux je la publie avec plaisir,en faisant au mieux, mais tu vas peut-être pas être déçu du voyage, je fais avec google trad. car je ne suis pas bilingue MOI

Invité
Invité


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: A little Pit History

Message  Christine le Ven 22 Juil - 20:56

Very Happy Vas-y Wink

_________________
J'ai décidé d'être heureux parce que c'est bon pour la santé - Voltaire
Nos livres : http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/theoaks

Nos Magazines :
http://www.etsy.com/shop/FaiiryLight?section_id=11851671
http://www.celticoak-chiens-de-france.com
avatar
Christine
Admin

Messages : 27917
Date d'inscription : 06/11/2008
Age : 46
Localisation : Plus tu t'en fout, plus tu seras heureux !

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.celticoak-chiens-de-france.com

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: A little Pit History

Message  Invité le Ven 22 Juil - 23:15

Le sport de sang faisiat tellement partie de la vie quotidienne en Angleterre que vers 1800, dans la ville de Wednesbury dans le Staffordshire comté, quand les cloches des églises de la célébration de la «vieille Sal", quand elle a finalement réussi à avoir des chiots. Sal était célèbre pour GAMENESS mais n'avait jamais été en mesure de dragonnet une civière. Si une chienne bouledogue mourrait pendant la mise bas dans ce district minier, les femmes sauvées souvent les chiots en les allaitant à leurs propres seins. Bullbaiting et d'autres sports de sang ne sont pas seulement un divertissement pour les classes laborieuses, mais pour toutes les classes. En fait, les rois et reines éxigeaient souvent qu'un concours soit organisé. Quand les ambassadeurs français ont visité la cour de la reine Elizabeth en 1559, la Reine les a gracieusement diverti avec un bon dîner suivi d'une exposition de taureaux , de chiens appâts et d' ours. Les éleveurs de Bull Terrier et certains éleveurs de Bulldog, dans le début des années 1800, ont essayé quelque chose de nouveau, espérant se reproduisent plus vite, des combattants féroces. Ils élevaient les appâts les plus redoutables pour faire des Bulldogs des chiens de combat plus dur, plus rapide, des terriers courageux. Cette croix a cru à renforcer la capacité de combat du Bulldog, en réduisant sa taille tout en conservant sa force, en augmentant sa vitesse et son agilité. Bien que certains historiens disent les enduits lisses noir et Tan et le blanc anglais Terrier (aujourd'hui disparu) étaient le plus souvent croisé avec Bulldogs, d'autres disent les terriers ont été choisis uniquement sur ​​la base des GAMENESS et la capacité de travail, et que divers Terrier-comme des chiens ont été utilisés. Le résultat de ces croisements a été appelé le Bull-Terrier et ou le moitié-moitié. Comme le temps passait, les Bull-terriers ont été élevé sélectivement, ils sont devenus une race reconnaissable en tant que pays émergents. A leur arrivée en Amérique les sport de sang ont été populaires, aussi, et le premier Bulldogs et le Bull-terriers ont été importés vers le Nouveau Monde plus à cette fin. Bien sur le bearbaiting a été interdit en Nouvelle-Angleterre dès les années 1600, ainsi que des spectacles publics, tels que bullbaiting, des compétitions pour les chiens tel que le rat-tuant, combats de chiens et de coqs qui étaient extrêmement populaires à New York lors de la fin du XVIIe et du début du XVIIIe siècle. Presque tous les meilleurs chiens de combats en Améraique étaient d'importations britanniques ou irlandais élevés depuis des générations pour le combat, et la plupart des Américains qui les ont importés ont continué la reproduction dans le même but. Dogfighting a ainsi accepté ces chiens en Amérique, en 1881, quand une bagarre a eu lieu à Louisville entre les fameuses importations anglais, pilote de Lloyd, détenue par «Cockney Charlie" Lloyd, et Berceau, propriété de Louis Krieger, l'Ohio et du chemin de fer du Mississippi annoncés excursion spéciale tarifs à la grande bataille. À l'arrivée à Louisville, les parieurs et les spectateurs ont été reçu dans un bel hôtel où ils ont été chaleureusement accueillis par le président du conseil d'échevin de Louisville, le chef de la police et autres responsables locaux. L'arbitre de la lutte a été William Harding, directeur des sports de La Gazette de la police, et le propriétaire-éditeur Richard K. Fox servi comme intervenants. Pilote et Berceau pesaient chacun un peu moins de £ 28, et ravirent les spectateurs en combattant vaillamment pour une heure et vingt-cinq minutes. Pilote a remporté la victoire. américanisation de la race et la crèche pilote, deux des chiens les plus célèbres de leur période, il pesait moins de 28 kilos, mais le poids d'un Pit Bull hommes d'aujourd'hui varie de 40 à 65 livres. Qu'est-il arrivé? Pilote et Crib étaient à la lutte contre le poids, mais bien qu'ils auraient normalement pesé plusieurs kilos de plus, il n'aurait pas été loin d'être suffisant pour compenser la différence. Une explication est que parce que les Américains semblent toujours croire que le plus grand est le meilleur, ils ont sélectionné de plus grands chiens pour la reproduction et ont ainsi créé un grand animal. Bien que cette théorie est partiellement correct, il est plus à l'histoire. On croit que l'utilité générale de la race à la frontière a été un facteur dans l'augmentation de sa taille. Les pionniers américains ont découvert envers Bull-and-Terrier la polyvalence, le courage et la dévotion, et bientôt les chiens voyagé à l'ouest, devenant membres indispensables du ranch de nombreuses exploitations familiales. Les chiens étaient bien adaptés à la vie sur la frontière, et gardé les fermes et les enfants avec confiance et autorité. Beaucoup d'entre eux ont également contribué à arrondir les stocks. En outre, ils ont protégé les animaux de la ferme des prédateurs et proscrit les rats, serpents, les coyotes et les ours. A parement, les colons ont probablement décidé que ce chien en étant un peu plus grand, avec le même style de corps et la même bravoure, aurait encore plus de chance de défendre les actions contre les lions de montagne en maraude et de ravager les loups. Par conséquent, lorsqu'ils séléctionnaire les partenaires de reproduction pour leurs chiens, ils choisirent les plus gros spécimens. La Journée du Chien-chaque chien n'a pas sa journée, mais le Pit Bull l'a certainement. Sa journée a été juste avant et pendant la Première Guerre mondiale, quand il avait une si haute estime et qu'il a représenté les Etats-Unis pendant une guerre mondiale à l'affiche illustrant chacune des forces alliées comme un chien vaillant originaire de son pays. Pendant ce temps, de nombreuses questions du magazine Life affichant en vedette des caricatures d-hommes politiques avec des Pit Bulls entant que personnages principaux. Les Pit Bulls ont même honoré les couvertures de la vie en 4 Février 1915, et à nouveau le 24 Mars, 1917. La première image, intitulée «The Morning After», a montré un Pit Bull bandée et cicatrices; le tard, sous-titré «Après six", affiché un pit-bull en gentleman portant un noeud papillon et chapeau haut. Deux d'entre eux ont été dessinés par Will Rannells. Pendant la Première Guerre mondiale, la race a été reconnue dignes d'estime par son pays. Un Pit Bull nommé Stubby a été le plus remarquable de la guerre Soldat Canine. Il a obtenu le grade de sergent, a été mentionné dans les dépêches officielles et a gagné deux médailles, une d'alerte, une attaque au gaz et l'autre pour la retenue d'une espionne allemande au Chemin des Dames avant que les troupes américaines arrivent. Après la guerre, la popularité du Pit Bull a continué de croître. En fonction de son utilité et de l'endoit où il a vécu, la race était encore connu sous plusieurs noms différents, tels que bouledogue, American Bull Terrier, Brindle Bull Dog, Yankee Terrier, chien Pit, et, bien sûr, American Pit Bull Terrier

Invité
Invité


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: A little Pit History

Message  Invité le Ven 22 Juil - 23:16

j'ai fait de mon mieux et avec mon coeur❤ désolé si vous ne comprenez pas tout Razz

Invité
Invité


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: A little Pit History

Message  Brian le Sam 23 Juil - 1:08

avatar
Brian

Messages : 3042
Date d'inscription : 07/11/2008

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: A little Pit History

Message  Christine le Sam 23 Juil - 1:24

Very Happy (rosé)

_________________
J'ai décidé d'être heureux parce que c'est bon pour la santé - Voltaire
Nos livres : http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/theoaks

Nos Magazines :
http://www.etsy.com/shop/FaiiryLight?section_id=11851671
http://www.celticoak-chiens-de-france.com
avatar
Christine
Admin

Messages : 27917
Date d'inscription : 06/11/2008
Age : 46
Localisation : Plus tu t'en fout, plus tu seras heureux !

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.celticoak-chiens-de-france.com

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: A little Pit History

Message  Invité le Sam 23 Juil - 10:33

merci merci trop d'honneur!! lol! lol!

Invité
Invité


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: A little Pit History

Message  Christine le Jeu 10 Jan - 20:06


_________________
J'ai décidé d'être heureux parce que c'est bon pour la santé - Voltaire
Nos livres : http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/theoaks

Nos Magazines :
http://www.etsy.com/shop/FaiiryLight?section_id=11851671
http://www.celticoak-chiens-de-france.com
avatar
Christine
Admin

Messages : 27917
Date d'inscription : 06/11/2008
Age : 46
Localisation : Plus tu t'en fout, plus tu seras heureux !

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.celticoak-chiens-de-france.com

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: A little Pit History

Message  Christine le Jeu 10 Jan - 20:25

Extrait du Magazine spécialisé Staffordshire Bull Terrier - Septembre 2011





_________________
J'ai décidé d'être heureux parce que c'est bon pour la santé - Voltaire
Nos livres : http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/theoaks

Nos Magazines :
http://www.etsy.com/shop/FaiiryLight?section_id=11851671
http://www.celticoak-chiens-de-france.com
avatar
Christine
Admin

Messages : 27917
Date d'inscription : 06/11/2008
Age : 46
Localisation : Plus tu t'en fout, plus tu seras heureux !

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.celticoak-chiens-de-france.com

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: A little Pit History

Message  HG le Jeu 24 Jan - 18:02

ça c'est beau !!!!


HG
The Oaks
The Oaks

Messages : 446
Date d'inscription : 29/08/2009
Localisation : LE THOLONET

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: A little Pit History

Message  HG le Ven 25 Jan - 15:47


HG
The Oaks
The Oaks

Messages : 446
Date d'inscription : 29/08/2009
Localisation : LE THOLONET

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: A little Pit History

Message  Christine le Sam 26 Jan - 7:30

Very Happy

_________________
J'ai décidé d'être heureux parce que c'est bon pour la santé - Voltaire
Nos livres : http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/theoaks

Nos Magazines :
http://www.etsy.com/shop/FaiiryLight?section_id=11851671
http://www.celticoak-chiens-de-france.com
avatar
Christine
Admin

Messages : 27917
Date d'inscription : 06/11/2008
Age : 46
Localisation : Plus tu t'en fout, plus tu seras heureux !

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.celticoak-chiens-de-france.com

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: A little Pit History

Message  Contenu sponsorisé


Contenu sponsorisé


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut

- Sujets similaires

 
Permission de ce forum:
Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum